CHAPTER 8:

 

Engineering

When a sauna is being designed you would expect that they are designing it to be the best and most effective sauna right?
 

Nope!
 

Many designers will design a sauna to be visually pleasing before efficiency.
 

And in this chapter, I’m going to show why there is much more to a well-designed and efficient sauna than just its visual appearance.

WHAT TO AVOID
 

Certain features in design can directly affect the efficiency and performance of an infrared sauna.
 

  • Large Glass Walls on the front and sides of a far infrared sauna looks good, but are not efficient. Too much glass means not enough room for an adequate number of far infrared heaters.
     

  • Inadequate Number of Heating Elements and Panels: This is a feature that you need to compare visually. Look for lots of pictures of the sauna interior. Poorly designed saunas have fewer heating elements and smaller heating elements, reducing the manufacturer’s cost at the expense of the sauna user's benefit.
     

  • Many inexpensive saunas use lightweight piano door hinges to support a heavy glass door insert. Hinges that are too small or too lightweight can lead to a door that sags and doesn’t close properly. Piano door hinges are a prime indicator that you are looking at a cheaply built sauna.
     

  • Many price-driven saunas have weak floors that are not properly supported by floor joists. Weak floors will sag and buckle with extended use. When shopping around, ask the sales representative if their floors are reinforced and their weight limit. Rocky Mountain Saunas’ floors have a 300-pound weight capacity in all residential and commercial models.
     

Note the location of the carbon far infrared panels in this four-person infrared sauna.
 

WHAT TO LOOK FOR
 

  • Large infrared heating panels that surround the sauna user on all interior walls
    will produce maximum body coverage and maximum far-infrared absorption.

    Quality far infrared saunas have large carbon heater panel coverage on 
    all walls,
    including front heaters on either side of the glass door, lower leg heater in the
    front of the bench seat, and the 
    floor heater for the feet.

     

  • Heavy-duty, adjustable stainless steel door hinges that support the glass and
    framework properly.

Note the location of the carbon far infrared panels

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